Archive for the ‘seafood’ Category

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Finding a cure – my first Twitter recipe

December 7, 2009

I try not to hang round on Twitter too often, as whole days can whiz by while I’m distracted by shiny baubles, but sometimes you can find gold there – like this easy wasabi & sake cured salmon.

It’s my first Twitter recipe – I’ve been resisting actual Twitter recipe providers, as I don’t think I’d ever get my head around all the acronyms they’d need to jam any decent recipe into 140 characters.

This is basically gravlax without the dill, with a Japanesy twist. Virginia, a brilliant web designer and food blogger, tweeted that she was making this dish, and I asked her for the recipe.

It’s so simple she could tell me with just a few tweets, but she also tells me it’s a Nigella Lawson original, so I also Googled around to find it available here, called ‘gravlax sashimi‘.

But if you can’t be bothered clicking away, just read on – preparing the whole thing takes about ten minutes max, and then it’s just a matter of waiting for the cure.

The recipe here says you can leave for up to five days, which I did because we were out for a couple of nights in a row after the third day. Yesterday I unveiled and sliced the salmon up and it is delicious.

It’s like gutsy-flavoured smoked salmon, and very silky, with the faintest wasabi tinge in the flavour. Too good. I am going to make batches of it to have on hand for Christmastide nibbles …

1. Mix 1 tbs wasabe, 3tbs caster, 1.5tbs sake, 3tbs salt into a paste.

2. Smear over both sides of a 500g salmon fillet.

3. Cover fillet & dish closely in cling wrap (tucking round the fish) and leave for three days, weighted with cans or jars or something. ‘Slice thinly and serve with other awesome things,’ as Virginia says.

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A new leaf – my miang goong

November 25, 2009

As I passed the excellent Fiji Market in King St, Newtown today (on the way home from the gym, that was – insert praise here), I remembered that’s where I’d seen the betel leaves used to make miang  kham, those little roll-up-and-stick-in-your-gob piles of Thai spicy goodness. So I popped in and snagged myself a pack of these fresh green heart-shaped lovelies (about 10 or 12 leaves for $2.50).

I have many times enjoyed the delectable Miang Goong at Thai Pothong described here but never attempted it myself till this evening. And I have to say, this is one of the zingiest new things I’ve tried in a long time. Tested these little babies not only on Senor but his two Wednesday piano students, adventurous primary-school gourmands Lulu and Riley and their caterer dad, and it got the thumbs up from all.

A quick Google search came up with a few recipes for Miang Khang (that’s without the goong – the prawns) and I chose this one to adapt.

The fiddly bit is the sauce – but I doubled the quantity of this one and had masses left over, now safely in the freezer for easy peasy quick Miang assembly for the next time or two.

My adaptation is here, but there must be lots of proper recipes about the place – I urge you to make this, because even though the sauce is fiddly, it’s much easier than you might think and very very good. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Little Patty

October 18, 2009

salmonpatties1Last weekend’s birthday party excesses left us with a heap of leftover poached salmon – the perfect excuse to indulge in some sixties-style comfort food: the classic salmon patty.

I made these last Sunday for a friend whose French mother happened to telephone as I was cooking and, being French, asked what was for dinner. My friend graciously described these little babies as salmon croquettes, which sounds far more glamorous. You can call them what you like, but they are sweet, crunchy, deliciously simple.

I enjoyed them so much that I cooked them again in a different house a few days later – this time not with leftover salmon but one medium fillet. Both times I discovered that a little salmon goes a hell of a long way (a single salmon fillet and one large potato made 12 medium-sized patties, for example), so I had leftovers to freeze both times. The second time I steamed the salmon fillet till just cooked through. This recipe is for the single fillet as it’s easier to work out quantities, but you’ll be able to judge for yourself – I’d suggest marginally more salmon than potato, and enough egg to make it bind.

What you need:

  • Steamed/cooked salmon, flaked
  • 1 potato, peeled, cooked & mashed
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1/3 bunch dill stems, finely chopped
  • 1 egg
  • very fine breadcrumbs (I hate buying them so made my own, but whatever works)
  • salt & pepper
  • vegetable oil, for shallow frying
  • yoghurt, honey & chopped dill, for dolloping

salmonpatties21. Fry the onion, garlic & dill stems till soft.

2. Combine the potato, salmon & onion mix in a bowl.

3. Add the broken egg and mix till well combined.

4. Form the mix into patties about 5cm diameter, and while the oil is heating, coat in breadcrumbs on either side.

5. When the oil is quite hot, shallow-fry on both sides till golden, and drain well on kitchen paper.

Serve with a green salad and a big fat dollop of yoghurt mixed with a little honey, lots of salt and chopped dill.

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Fishy (and salty) business

July 1, 2009

stephsaltcodThe Empress’ Sydney Morning Herald Good Living column this week is on salt cod – mmmmmmmm. She writes:

Since the advent of refrigeration and better transport, there’s no storage imperative to salt fish. But try telling that to the Portuguese, who have bacalhau so firmly entrenched in their culinary repertoire there’s no turning back. Soaking in water renders the stiff, dried fish soft, palatable and ready to be made into any of the 365 recipes the Portuguese have devised for it. But salt cod isn’t only the preserve of the Portuguese. The French are also fans of salt cod, which they call morue, and transform into warm puree with olive oil, garlic and moistened bread.

She samples salt cod French, Portuguese & Italian style.  And it sounds good.

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Fishy business

June 3, 2009

steph1The Empress Clifford-Smith turns her attention to small and salty fish in her column this week – and oh my, how good does that little sardine number from the Burlington look?

You will find Steph’s Good Living column here.

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Simplest lunch in the world

May 5, 2009

prawns2A flying visit to the tropics for the weekend, with family at beautiful Magnetic Island in far North Queensland. It is an excellent escape and we plan to do it again before winter is out. Perfect swimming weather, and still warm enough to eat outdoors in the evening.

So if it’s cold where you are, and you want to pretend it’s still summer, turn up the heat and whack this on the table for the easiest lunch in the world.  

1. Cooked prawns. We had tigers one day and red spots the next – succulent, flavoursome, delicious.

2. Bread. Sourdough best, otherwise any good crusty white.

3. Green salad with good oil & balsamic dressing.

4. Mayonnaise – preferably Norganics Soya Mayonnaise, otherwise Hellman’s (or homemade, obviously, if you can be bothered).

5. Two glasses of Veuve Clicquot.

Happy, happy, happy day.